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File: 1566572396622.png (16.24 KB, 667x297, 667:297, calc.PNG) ImgOps iqdb

 No.46627

I've spent about 1.2 years between 2009 and today on steam games (counting only approximate waking hours). I suspect most of my fellow wizards have been in game for far longer within that same time span. How much time do you estimate you've sacrificed to this hobby and do you have any regrets about it? Personally, I only regret the time I dedicated to games that I didn't truly enjoy.

 No.46628

I play games only to waste time, so I have no regrets because they wasted my time, maybe my only regret would be that I have never found a game that is actually fun

 No.46629

>>46628
Even when you were younger you didn't have fun in a game? Or do you reject the idea of fun altogether? When I was a kid I was eager to get back in the game because I could fully immerse myself and escape and have great power and autonomy in the simulation. I call that fun. I can't do that anymore as easily.

 No.46630

>>46629
I realized the fun I had with video games as a kid wasn't from the video games themselves, but because they were just another novel thing to me at the time and also I could play them with my parents and my sister, which was a sort of social activity, and that satisfied my social needs because I was a shy kid with no friends and I wouldn't have had social interaction with my parents/sister otherwise. I think video games as a boring time waster started to really set in as a teen when I secluded myself to my room to play pc games. I've probably spent a fair amount of time in my life just sitting in my pc chair with a video game open at the pause menu just sitting and zoning out into space, only so I could unpause and pretend I was doing something if anyone entered my room. Maybe my biggest regret with video games is not consciously realizing sooner how truly empty and boring they are so that I could have maybe done something else, learned something, got interested in a cool hobby, I don't know.

 No.46631

>>46627
have you checked out the wizard steam group?

 No.46636

>>46632
>>46631
?

 No.46639

People waste their time on far worse crap than video games.

 No.46642

>>46630
I think I understand what you mean. Sometimes I stare at my steam library for hours weighing the benefits of one game over another before finally playing one for maybe twenty minutes. For me, I don't do this to appear occupied. Rather, I look at these games and now most look like different forms of work, which I weigh intensely. The game has become looking at the games I guess.

>>46632

That's about 1.7 years

>>46631
If you tell me how to examine it I may join

 No.46660

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>>46627

I can't exactly say for certain, since I don't use Steam all that much, but it'd certainly be interesting to know the precise figure. If I were to guess, I's say something like 2-3 years total since 2008, would be a fair estimate.

>Personally, I only regret the time I dedicated to games that I didn't truly enjoy.


Yep, same here. That's essentially my only regret as well. The amount of time I wasted grinding out tally based achievements (like needing, for instance, to boost MP related achievements for upwards of 100 hours), in astonishingly crappy games, is all I really cringe about when I think back on all these years I've sunk into gaming. Falling headfirst into the achievement trap squandered a lot of time I could've spent playing the highly regarded classics & hidden gems that are out there on various platforms, or, even outside of that, just generally playing things that I enjoy for their own sake. In addition, much of the burnout & anhedonia I suffer from now in regards to gaming as a whole, can also be traced back to my, often dawn to dusk, obsession with achievement hunting, which has made making up for lost time a real struggle as well.

Achievement addiction was to me, what WoW addiction was to most other people. A complete black hole that swallowed up all my waking hours for what was essentially nothing in the end, aside from the gigantic collection of digital stamps I amassed along the way. Comparing & competing with other achievement hunters on leaderboards like PSNP made it a bit of a meta-MMO in a sense, but, at the end of the day, aside from boosting some achievements on occasion, I was essentially just completely on my own. I've actually never played an MMO before, but at least in WoW, or whatever else, there seemed to be more of a meaningful social aspect to it, what with clans & raiding & such. By comparison, trophies/achievements were just a very niche, almost invisible, sort of affair. When all's said & done, I just wish I could've shrugged it all off sooner, but it is what it is. There are worse regrets to have in life, I suppose.


>>46639

What really isn't a waste of time, though? Learning how to play guitar, or learning how to code, playing some stimulating game, watching anime, grinding items in an MMO, or reading some dusty old book on this or that topic, it's all the same. At the end of the day, all those things are just as equally worthless & meaningless as anything else. As long as you're able to enjoy or distract yourself to the fullest extent possible, but, even then, it's still just a waste of time.

Sorry, I don't mean to go on some random autistic rant or nitpick what you said, but it just confuses me sometimes how some people can't seem to see how literally everything we do as humans are arbitrary wastes of time and that nothing we do is of any value, aside from what we arbitrarily assign to it as individuals.

 No.46669

think of it like flight time for pilots

you're a fully certified gamer at this point with all those hours under your belt

 No.46798

>>46660
>achievement addiction
OP here. I suffer from the achievement syndrome and I have done some stupid things for these digital stamps like fiddling with the program memory or changing the system clock on my computer. I'm not even in a competitive achievement group and the number of steam friends I have can be counted on one hand. It's simply torment for my OCD.

On the other hand, without all this achievement hunting I wouldn't be nearly as good at CK2 as I am.

 No.46799

I don't see it as time sacrificed because for the most part I enjoyed it and see most of it as time well spent.

 No.46804

>do you have any regrets about it?
Like >>46799 said, I see the time I played games as well spent, not wasted. At their core games are about relieving boredom and bringing joy. If a game achieves those two things I don't regret playing it.
>Personally, I only regret the time I dedicated to games that I didn't truly enjoy.
Whenever I feel like I'm stuck in a rut I just turn cheats on and breeze through the rest of the game. Some rpgs turn to grindfests so I have to resort to cheating to enjoy the story's conclusion.
>How much time do you estimate you've sacrificed to this hobby
A lot. I don't have steam so I can't give an accurate estimate. In my teen years I played 6 hours a day and now I spend 2-3, so maybe about a year like you.

 No.46827

>>46642
Search wizchan in the steam community group search engine

 No.46828

>>46798
>I have done some stupid things for these digital stamps like fiddling with the program memory or changing the system clock on my computer
Doesn't this take away from getting the achievements, though? Or was it not something you did in the spirit of cheating?

 No.46844

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>>46798

>I have done some stupid things for these digital stamps like fiddling with the program memory or changing the system clock on my computer.


Yep, I can recall doing much the same with certain games in the past. There was actually this one achievement contained within one of Mafia 2's DLC packs, where you needed to drive a ridiculous amount of miles in-game to get it. Doing it manually would've been way too tedious so, to more easily expedite the process, I followed this tip I found online of how to glitch out of the map so your vehicle was constantly "moving" and accumulating progress towards the achievement. The catch was that you needed to have one of the buttons on the controller be periodically pressed to keep the game "active" (taping down the triggers wasn't enough), otherwise it would just auto-pause. Or something to that effect, which also couldn't be disabled. Anyway, since I didn't have a turbo controller (the hassle getting one would've saved me, let me tell you), I jerry-rigged a fan with a pencil taped to it, so as to constantly tap one of the buttons on my controller, which I had also taped to an adjacent vertical object to better situate it. It was the most ridiculous thing you'd ever seen, but it worked. Pretty much ruined the controller in the process (what with all the sticky tape & shit that was stuck to it afterwards), but at least I got my precious achievement. I can also remember autistically freaking out when I thought my brother had messed with the fan, therefore potentially interrupting my progress towards the achievement, which then led to me bogarding our families only TV at the time to make sure everything was alright. I'd like to say that was the only time I went crazily overboard for an achievement, but, sadly, there were many more similar moments to that one, grinding or banging my head against a wall on this or that achievement, all the while stuck in a stinking quagmire of my own making.

>I'm not even in a competitive achievement group and the number of steam friends


Neither was I, really. For six years, starting in 2008, I was an achievement hunter on PS3 (I know they're technically termed as trophies, but I often just refer to them as achievements now, since it simply feels like an easier shorthand to use). Anyway, all the "friends" on my PSN account, were just boosting partners I'd forgotten to delete, or just left sitting there in case I needed them again in the future, after I had finished boosting a particular game. They'd sometimes ask me about how good/bad a particular game I was playing at the time was, but, aside from that, I never interacted with them. In the end, it was basically all business. You scratch my back, I scratch yours. If I'm honest though, I was always too anxious to make it anything more than that.

The competitive aspect was only a self-imposed sort of thing when I discovered the likes of PSNP, which tracked one's completion ratio, trophy rarity, and global standing. At the same time, I was pretty much aloof about the whole thing, since, like yourself, I wasn't part of any larger groups that could take notice of it, so what did it matter? Throughout it all I always had this sense of something to prove, though. Prove to whom? Well myself, of course. No matter how hard or how rare the trophies were and no matter how wonderful the sense of satisfaction was when I finally got them, it was never enough. Before too long, those same hard earned trophies, would be worth less than dirt to me and I'd need to go proving myself all over again, in some other dreadful experience. Sisyphus pushing a boulder up a hill, basically. As a result, I'd pretty much just check my standing on PSNP only to autistically manage my profile & oogle at my own vain little monument to myself. It was also, perhaps most importantly, a record of continuity for myself. One that, to this day, I find I can't do without in some form. Instead, I just keep a list of all the games I finish, which, for the most part, satiates this same need for a sense of progress & continuity.


>It's simply torment for my OCD.


You got that right. I liken it to the talons of a hawk being squarely embedded in my brain. Squeezing & digging in harder & harder the more reluctant I became into abiding my obsession and carrying through with this self-defeating sense of due diligence. No matter how mind-numbingly dreadful the task might have been, or often was, I had become enslaved to the irrational compulsion that it simply must be done. Even if it drove me very nearly to the point of complete madness, as it quite often did, I soldiered on. That was until I eventually reached my breaking point near the end of 2014. The whole culmination of that six year long self-inflicted ordeal did irreparable harm to my mental health & emotional state, leaving me intensely anxiety ridden for weeks afterwards. In the end, I came out the other side of it, but it'd be disingenuous to say that my OCD still doesn't plague me. Dropping my trophy obsession lessened the grip of those proverbial talons to a certain degree, but at the cost of my continuity & sense of self-worth, however flawed & prideful it may have been.

Since the end of 2014, following my falling out with trophies, I've been gaming exclusively on PC. At first I found it quite difficult to participate in gaming as a much needed distraction from myself without the ever present scoreboard of my PSN profile, tallying all my dubiously illustrious feats, but as the months went on, I managed to forget and in fact appreciate its absence.

I'd hardly say I'm "free", though. As much as it pains me to admit it, those self-defeating tendencies still linger in me. No doubt that it's all far easier to ignore than it used to be, but that need to endlessly prove myself remains in me still. I don't use Steam often, but in the times when I do, it's hard to ignore the achievements present in certain games. Playing Thief 2014 on Steam for example I went after most of the achievements there, like all the difficulty modifier ones, just so I could feel that same sense of accomplishment I got with trophies. As it is, at least I don't bother to get every achievement nowadays. Just most of them, or the most worthy ones.

Torrenting almost all the games I play, thereby freeing me of the sorts of similar achievement systems present on Steam, helps a lot to keep me on track, but, even then, I find myself still feeling like I need to prove myself somehow. This mostly takes the form of always playing on the highest difficulty available, assuming it's not ludicrously or obnoxiously hard (one hit & you die, or something like that). That combined with the list I keep of all the games I finish, allows me a pseudo-sense of progress, middling self-satisfaction & continuity, somewhat similar to the kind I had when trophy/achievement hunting all those years ago. It's imperfect and can often cause me as much stress as trophies/achievements did, (gotta finish this crappy game so I can add it to my list, gotta collect everything or complete the hardest challenges so I can feel good about myself, etc.), but it's the best middle ground I've been able to find.

I'm actually in the middle of playing Shovel Knight for the first time, (the GoG version, which I got off rutracker), and the achievement system present in the game itself referred to as "feats", is triggering my OCD in this regard. I just wanted to finish it and move on, but I've found myself trying to do most of the "feats", or achievements, triggering that old obsession. I hate it when developers do this. Why can't they leave this sort of shit out of the game for fuck's sake? I've told myself I'll only collect like 80% of them and leave it at that, since any of the achievements related to clearing the game without any deaths or destroying all the checkpoints would be way too much of an unfun hassle for me to do and I'd rather not have that ruin the game for me, like similar sorts of things have for other games in the past.

 No.46845

>>46844

(Continued…)

>>46828

>Doesn't this take away from getting the achievements, though?


Not the guy you asked, but accepted forms of cheating has been pretty much commonplace in achievement/trophy hunting circles since their inception. So long as you're not hacking the achievements themselves to auto-unlock them all at once, pretty much anything else is fair game. Boosting MP trophies/achievements is probably the most accepted & somewhat understandable form of "cheating" out there since, very often, it's pretty much the only possible way to get those trophies/achievements. It doesn't change the fact however that it's still, technically speaking, a form of cheating. There are other examples, though. Like say there's a glitch that allows you to finish the highest difficulty in a game by reloading the final checkpoint and watching the credits. That's essentially a huge cheat, but shit like that is actively encouraged and even sought after in trophy or achievement hunting communities since it saves tons of time & energy and gets you what you're after. The justification being that the developers left it in there, whether by mistake or by accident, so it's fair game. Everybody decides it's okay, even though, at the end of day, it's a form of cheating no different than, in some sense, simply hacking the achievement/trophy itself would be.

Another lighter example, would be with the aforementioned Shovel Knight. In Shovel Knight you can actually still get "beat the game with no deaths" achievement even if one happens to die during the process of it. You see, you can die plenty of times, but so long as you exit the level after you die, the death never registers to the game itself (since it only saves at the end of the level), so you can simply re-enter the level and try again as many times as it takes until you clear that stage with no deaths. It's still a challenge of course, but doing the achievement in this way remains as, irregardless, a form of cheating. Yet, even when you check guides on PS3T or Steam itself, this sort of thing is encouraged, since otherwise it would simply be too hard to do for most players, so everyone just thinks "fuck it, everybody says it's okay, so I'm taking the path of least resistance".

Needless to say, but there are many internal contradictions & hypocrisies in achievement/trophy hunting circles. They operate off their own set of rules & guidelines which, like with anything else I suppose, are designed to mostly benefit the users themselves even if it's at the cost of any sort of consistency.

 No.46888

>>46828
I have only used cheats like this for what I consider unreasonable achievements or when I feel cheated by the game. I consider figuring out the hack worthy of the achievement in such instances. Examples:

Universe sandbox:
An achievement where you must spend a full IRL year in game.
An achievement where you have to start the game 20,000 times.

Baldur's gate enhanced:
Most achievements because I beat the game twice before steam achievements were added

Icewind dale enhanced:
Same as baldurs gate

Etc…

>>46844
Great post. I should add that though it is a very silly and unproductive obsession, game achievements are at least a banal obsession in my experience. It never had gotten to the point of causing mental distress of the level you describe. As it occupies my mind, it actually forces out the very disturbing obsessions and tendencies that cause me immense suffering. I feed this minor problem so that major ones starve and hopefully eventually leave me alone. I imagine my psyche like a grazing pasture. I fill it so full with cows that the huns can't physically fit in. Cows fart and stink but at least they don't rape and pillage.

 No.46905

>>46845
>So long as you're not hacking the achievements themselves to auto-unlock them all at once
Yeah, that sort of thing was more or less what I was addressing in specific, since that's flat out using an external program/means to get an achievement. Most of the other things you mentioned (like boosting) I would consider borderline–it's not in the spirit of the achievement's challenge, but I'm not sure you could call it cheating (plus, boosting is an absolute necessity for games with dead multiplayer these days, in those cases it's entirely justified).

Other stuff like exploits or glitches devolves into more of a grey area, I think. For instance, in your Shovel Knight example, I personally wouldn't consider abusing the save mechanics cheating per se (although, again, against the spirit of the achievement, you're "cheating yourself" I guess), but using a bug to automatically take you to the end of the game would be cheating, in my opinion. But of course, it all comes down to personal interpretation. You see a lot of the same discussion taking place in speedrun communities.

>>46888
Yeah, I think those are reasonably fair circumstances. It would definitely be crippling to get 99% of a game's achievements, only to have some dumb bullshit like "kill the developer :)" or awful grindy shit like you referenced. I feel like every game always has that one bullshit achievement, so I typically don't bother with 100%ing. I do find it fun to go for really difficult achievements though, especially if they force you to play the game in a different or interesting way (Orange Box achievements were great about this, like escorting the garden gnome to the end or playing through Ravenholm with only the gravity gun).

As an aside, a dumb story: I remember trying to 100% Mercenaries 2 (a painfully mediocre and buggy game if you've never played it) around the time it came out. It was a horrible experience because the game was a buggy piece of shit with horrible AI, and some of the achievements were contingent on keeping 50 or so NPCs alive throughout the game, who would almost always kill themselves. Anyway, it was so fucking buggy that one day every single achievement just unlocked for me for no reason whatsoever. Thanks, shitty devs.

 No.46944

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>>46905

>but I'm not sure you could call it cheating (plus, boosting is an absolute necessity for games with dead multiplayer these days, in those cases it's entirely justified)


Agreed. As you say, "not in the spirit of the achievement's intended challenge", is probably a better way to describe it than simply as cheating. As the both of us pointed out, boosting is often the only way to acquire these sorts of pesky, if not near impossible, to acquire MP achievements/trophies, so it's more than understandable why many, including myself in the past, would resort to it.

>For instance, in your Shovel Knight example, I personally wouldn't consider abusing the save mechanics cheating per se


Again, I actually agree with you. As I said originally, it was only intended as a light example of what could possibly be construed as cheating to an outsider or otherwise impartial third-party. Personally, I just see it as an acceptable quirk of the game, that if the developers really didn't want abused would've patched it out already, and that it's there for those who want to make their time at getting what they're after a little bit easier.

>But of course, it all comes down to personal interpretation. You see a lot of the same discussion taking place in speedrun communities.


Yep, that it does. Like I said before, most anything is fair game, benevolent glitches & all, assuming it is you can find them & take advantage of them. I also find it fitting you mention the speedrunning community, since I've always thought they've shared a lot of similarities, aside from the fact that speedrunning will get you far more recognition than achievement/trophy hunting, assuming that's what one is after. I can recall watching that infamous "Speedrunning in a nutshell" video that's sometimes posted around for the first time and laughing about how at least half of the stuff the guy goes on about could just as easily apply to achievement/trophy hunting as well, if not moreso.

>It would definitely be crippling to get 99% of a game's achievements, only to have some dumb bullshit like "kill the developer :)" or awful grindy shit like you referenced. I feel like every game always has that one bullshit achievement


I actually started screening games, and perusing their trophy lists online, before actually playing them, just so I could avoid this sort of thing. I actually went so far as to play Uncharted 3 on a separate account just so I wouldn't have to grind out & boost all of its annoying MP trophies. I'd also often avoid games that had tons of DLC, or would have lots of future DLC, given how much of a stickler I was for keeping all the games on my profile at 100%. I was such a major completionist in fact that, in the few times when I was the victim of a sudden server shutdown (as was, for me, the case with Ghostbusters: The Video Game), I'd literally find myself experiencing a crippling, near heart stopping panic attack, since my profile would now be forever stained with an incomplete game. The anxiety would often plague me for days & days afterwards and go on haunting me for much longer than that. Glitched or buggy trophies were much the same affair, causing me just as much, in not more, mental duress.

>I do find it fun to go for really difficult achievements though, especially if they force you to play the game in a different or interesting way (Orange Box achievements were great about this, like escorting the garden gnome to the end or playing through Ravenholm with only the gravity gun).


Those were, indeed, always the best sorts of achievements/trophies to go after. Bulletstorm springs to mind as one game that had a lot of neat little level specific actions to preform, instead of it just being "kill x amount of enemies with such & such weapon". A shame that the Orange Box was released before trophies were implemented. It wasn't until somewhat recently, as I was replaying the HL series on Steam, that I was finally able to acquire all of its latter achievements, while having a surprisingly good deal of enjoyment in doing so. Moving that garden gnome was much more of pain than I thought it was going to be though, I must admit. Portal 2 also had a really good trophy/achievement list. Would you believe that I managed to finish the entire co-op campaign and acquire 100% of the trophies therein completely solo? Aside from that one where you literally needed another player to go through the tutorial with, I just used two controllers in split-screen and would quickly swap between them when moving/positioning each character. It was less of a pain in the ass than you might, but, irregardless, it was definitely still a hassle. Better than talking with some stranger over a mic, that's for sure. Aside from one occasion when boosting TC's:HAWX, I've literally never used a mic when gaming. To this day, I still haven't. It sometimes pissed people off when I was a trophy addict, but I was always able to make do with the PSN instant chat service, or just PM text messages.


>As an aside, a dumb story: I remember trying to 100% Mercenaries 2


Hah, that's funny. That game caused me a huge amount of stress, thanks to its notoriously buggy online trophies preventing me from getting the platinum. I was literally, physically overjoyed when I finally managed to get them, and the platinum with it, after thinking that I never would. Don't recall ever having an issue with the HVT trophy, but, I'll admit, I was probably just very lucky.

I think, for me, Warhawk will always be that one game that stands tall above all others, for how ridiculously obnoxious its trophies were. Literally 1000 hours of boosting required to platinum. One. Thousand. Hours.

Boosting three other infamously grindy games like Chronicles of Riddick, FEAR 2 & BF:BC combined was probably something like 400-600 hours total for me. Whenever I attempted boosting Warhawk, I'd just be floored about how long it'd take and feel my brain literally dying inside my skull in protest and would thus find myself quitting shortly thereafter. Even I, as autistically obsessed as I was, had my limits.

 No.47013

>>46944
>I was such a major completionist in fact that, in the few times when I was the victim of a sudden server shutdown (as was, for me, the case with Ghostbusters: The Video Game), I'd literally find myself experiencing a crippling, near heart stopping panic attack, since my profile would now be forever stained with an incomplete game.
That's unfortunate. I was going to question why you don't screen out multiplayer games altogether (since they almost -always- have horrendous online achievements that can be rendered impossible or near impossible to get), but every game you mentioned is more or less a singleplayer game with tacked-on multiplayer. I guess in those instances, you're always going to be in for a rough time if you're a completionist, especially if you're on console and can't easily hack in completed achievements.

>It was less of a pain in the ass than you might, but, irregardless, it was definitely still a hassle. Better than talking with some stranger over a mic, that's for sure.

On the note of incomplete achievements that still cause me pain to this day, as well as a series of cautionary tales about trying for achievements with strangers online, I'm reminded of the Vidmaster challenges from the Halo games. If you've never played Halo, they were a set of extremely difficult achievements that, if completed, would reward a set of Recon armor that you could use in multiplayer (previously only given out to people by the developers for doing cool shit).

They were spread out across Halo 3 and Halo ODST, and 2 of them in particular required you to beat the final levels of both games on the hardest difficulty in 4-player co-op, with a difficulty modifier that requires you to restart from the last checkpoint if a single player dies, and under the stipulation that you had to beat the level in shittier vehicles than what you were normally allowed to use (this was particularly bad in ODST, since you normally get to beat the level in a tank, but you instead had to use a shitty ATV with someone on the back using a rocket launcher).

For both achievements, I found people on the Bungie forums to do them with. First, for the Halo 3 achievement, we spent HOURS painfully grinding to the end of the level. It was a really difficult time, but we made it through the roughest parts and got to the end. After, again, hours and hours of fucking suffering, 2 of the chuckleheads in the group suddenly started killing me and the other person out of the blue for no reason. They just kept going "umad bro? umad? we trol u haha". It was honestly just bewildering–they wasted such an incredible amount of their own time just to grief us? I wasn't really even upset, just taken aback.

Then, for the Halo ODST achievement, I again got another group of people. One of the guys in the group was some guy who was in his early 20s, and wouldn't stop bragging about how he was a mature adult with a wife and a kid. It was an incredibly difficult achievement, so naturally me and the other people started to get frustrated and bicker at one another. Despite that, we got past the hardest part and pretty much settled down after that. Just as we had settled down and were nearing the end of the level, though, the other guy up and goes "You know, I can't keep playing with a bunch of kids that just wanna fight with one another, I'm a grown adult with a wife and a kid, you know, you guys are so immature and really need to grow up" (bear in mind this guy was probably only 5-6 years older than us), and quits after all the hours we spent getting to that point. Yet again, it was really bewildering and out of the blue. It would have been somewhat understandable if he had quit halfway through the hard section, but we were near the end of the level and everyone was acting amiably again.

I never did end up getting either fucking achievement and it bothers me to this day. Maybe I'll have a second chance when they rerelease the Halo games for PC.

 No.47061

>>47013

>I was going to question why you don't screen out multiplayer games altogether (since they almost -always- have horrendous online achievements that can be rendered impossible or near impossible to get)


I often asked myself the same question, frankly. In the end though, it actually almost worked out in my favor, in a rather masochistic sense. MK vs DC, & TC's Endwar, were two games that did quite a number on my psyche and were, in their own way, the final prelude towards me finally giving up this fucked obsession of mine towards trophies/achievements. MK vs DC being the one that caused me the most anguish by far, a game I had accidentally added to my profile before I really started taking trophies seriously. I had returned to it only because I had caught wind of its servers shutting down & didn't want a repeat of what happened with Ghostbusters. It was a race against time to unlock what I was missing, given that, in my case, I had less than a week to do so. Made even worse by the fact that these trophies were notoriously glitchy & buggy to unlock. As an example, it literally took me an extra 100+ matches to get the "Play 100 matches trophy", which alone was making me panic like crazy thinking I'd never get it until, somehow, it finally managed to pop for me. I got what I was after in the end, but to put it in perspective, the amount of stress I incurred as a result of all that, was almost the equivalent to getting brutally beaten, since that whole experience was nothing short of extreme violence committed against my sanity. Mental violence, but violence nonetheless. Still though, it was almost what I needed in a sense. Very rarely does one give up compulsions like this before being almost completely destroyed by them. True for autistic basket cases like myself, at least.

As you say though, it was quite difficult to avoid MP trophies altogether, since it was very often a factor in many games. Regardless, I did seem to have a bit of a persistent sado-masochistic streak in me. Often picking the worst & most time-consuming games to try and finish. Was very much a form of unconscious self-harm, that, in some ways, would eclipse any other you could care to mention.

>if you're on console and can't easily hack in completed achievements.


It's actually easier than you might think, at least in some instances. By using someone else's modified save file, you could sometimes trick a game into unlocking particular trophies for you. I was always too paranoid to do that however, thinking I would be found out & banished from the likes of PSNP. Far better to just swallow the shittiness of an incomplete game, than resort to other measures and be labeled a cheater forever, thereby having your entire profile be invalidated as a result. In retrospect though, it sure would've saved me a lot of hassle. The hell I put my sanity through for nothing, but an abstraction. Sacrificing my well being so as to conform to silly ideas & notions of conduct for a bunch of, what are to me now, worthless digital stamps that sucked away my very life force & time. What a horrifying waste. Pissing away my peak media consuming years on stupid shit & maladaptive mind games like this, leaving me nothing more than an anhedonic wreck in the end. As I said originally, my only regret is that I wasn't playing stuff that I actually enjoyed, or otherwise interesting classics & hidden gems, which all fell to the wayside thanks to this once stupid obsession with trophies/achievements.

Anyway, I appreciate you sharing that story of yours with me and I find it quite relatable in my own way. There's more boosting sessions than I'd care to mention where I witnessed that same kind of petty, childish & confounding nonsense going on. Fortunately enough for me, most times the whole process would be like a well oiled machine, assuming you had the right participants. Other times however, it'd just be chaos with people running around like morons & fucking things up because there was either no sense of established order, or they were just too impatient/stupid to wait their turn & follow the rules.

>I never did end up getting either fucking achievement and it bothers me to this day. Maybe I'll have a second chance when they rerelease the Halo games for PC.


Sorry to hear that. Sounds like kind of an interesting achievement, though. Better than something like "Get 10 000 kills, k thx bai", at least. Aside from Halo 1 & 2, I'm pretty much estranged from the series. I never owned a 360, so there's a lot of exclusive titles from there that I never got the chance to play, like any of Gears series, for instance. Aside from the 1st one anyway, given that it's the only one that was released on PC. Are the other Halo games coming to PC, by the way? That's the first I've heard of it.

Just as an aside, but that achievement also reminds me of some of the more trickier achievements/trophies that are present in the Payday games. As impossible & self-defeating as it sounds, I actually managed to 100% both games, DLC included, without ever using a mic. This was also on PS3 & while I was still a trophy hunter, by the way. One of the toughest things I can remember was this particular trophy in Payday 2, which required you to get through a rather difficult heist, with multiply placed and sometimes random objectives, without any alarms going off. In our case, we were able to coordinate by using the instant chat service present on PSN, which I've mentioned before. Must've taken us nearly a 100 attempts, but I was lucky to be playing with some pretty solid guys, which I had got in touch with through the stickied boosting thread on PS3T. Like me, they just wouldn't give up & were determined to see it through. I swear that, to this day, I wish I had somehow been able to record our winning attempt. In our case, we were just at the end when, out of nowhere, one of the AI had managed to spot us. In response, each of us dropped our signal jammers one after the other, in perfect unity just as the last one was about to expire, as we hauled ass to the exit point getting there just in time before the alarm managed to go off. It doesn't sound particular impressive I guess, but, to me, that shit was hall of fame levels of gloriousness and something that would be the center-piece in a highlight or compilation of other similar feats from that game. Definitely one of the best & most satisfying co-op experiences I've ever had, given how perfect that winning attempt was & how in the zone & telepathically linked to each other we were. Which itself, truth be told, is juxtaposed against how much of a tedious, inglorious slog the rest of the trophies in those games were, made worse by my refusal to use a mic. All taken together, I was quite a silly bitch and I'm even surprised myself that I didn't catch more grief for this sort of thing.

 No.47158

>>47061
>Far better to just swallow the shittiness of an incomplete game, than resort to other measures and be labeled a cheater forever, thereby having your entire profile be invalidated as a result.
You know, that sort of reminds me of another dumb achievement related story I have.

Around the time it was released, I was trying to get all of the achievements in Call of Duty 4. There were collectibles in every level, and naturally, an achievement to get all of them. You could also unlock cheats in that game, although most of which weren't even cheats, but just goofy visual filters that didn't give you any advantage whatsoever. One of the visual filters was a "ragtime' mode that sped up the game (enemies included), and added a brown filter + silly ragtime music. I used this "cheat" because it sped up the process of getting all of the collectibles…without realizing that they wouldn't count towards the achievement if you collected them with cheats activated. And, there was no way to get the collectibles back, your profile would be permanently ruined–except, there was some weird glitch you could perform involving two controllers that would reset your in-game progress. I ended up having to jury rig the glitch with a Guitar Hero controller I had on hand, it was goofy as hell.

>Are the other Halo games coming to PC, by the way? That's the first I've heard of it.

Yeah, surprisingly: https://store.steampowered.com/app/976730/Halo_The_Master_Chief_Collection/

Some guys released a modified version of a leaked build of Halo Online (which was a PC, F2P, multiplayer-only Halo that was, very strangely, released only in Russia and shut down after a year or two), and it lit a fire under Microsoft's ass to release the Halo games on PC, I guess. From what I understand, they're going to be releasing the games & additional features (like modding and map editors) in a very piecemeal fashion, starting with Reach.

If you're interested, you can still download and play the aforementioned mod here: https://eldewrito.com/ , but development is paused and I don't know if it still has an active playerbase. I played it a little and it was incredibly fun, though.

>I never owned a 360, so there's a lot of exclusive titles from there that I never got the chance to play, like any of Gears series

Eh, you weren't missing much. It was the go-to multiplat console for its time, but I don't think its library holds up very well nowadays in terms of exclusives and whatnot. That's my opinion, anyway. Gears was alright.

>As impossible & self-defeating as it sounds, I actually managed to 100% both games, DLC included

Holy shit. Props, man. Some of the achievements in that game are brutal, and there's a fuckton of them. I played a ton of Payday 2 (and some Playday 1), I loved it. There really isn't any other game like it. I enjoyed a lot of the achievements for it–some of them fell into that unique category I mentioned earlier, where they really forced you to play the game in a unique way, although most of them were menial garbage or just simple "beat this level on x, y, & z difficulties". I am also fucking awful at stealth games and that made for some rough times. I couldn't imagine going for all of the achievements, though. I deluded myself into thinking I might go for it one day, but, quite frankly, I really didn't want to spend money on the positively absurd amount of DLC it had (I bought a fair bit of it but after a certain point enough was enough). Even so, achievement hunting in that game was incredibly addicting.



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