[ Home ] [ wiz / dep / hob / lounge / jp / meta / games / music ] [ all ] [  Rules ] [  FAQ ] [  Search /  History ] [  Textboard ] [  Wiki ]

/wiz/ - Wizardry

Disregard Females, Acquire Magic
Email
Comment
File
Embed
Password (For file deletion.)

  [Go to bottom]   [Catalog]   [Return]   [Archive]

File: 1640107786622.png (974.69 KB, 1039x581, 1039:581, biden-anime.png) ImgOps iqdb

 No.186464

Any1 here feels bad about how much time they wasted on philosophy, religions, or generally on seeking the "ultimate truth"? I can't take it seriously anymore. It seems to me like meaningless word-plays, all of it, politics, philosophy, everything. So much shit that doesn't have anything to do with my life, you know what I mean? Should have just read 07th expansion VNs or watched cartoons/movies instead of wasting my time on trying to become an intellectual or wise person.

 No.186467

Philosophy is inherently worthless as knowledge about the true purpose of the world will not chance the properties of the world. That said, developing your own personal philosophy or simply ruminating on it is worthwhile as it can be therapeutic and helps cope with life.

 No.186485

You need to study it to understand that it's bullshit. Otherwise, it is plain to see that most people live their whole lives with fucked up nonsensical beliefs that prevent them from seeing clearly

 No.186489

>>186464
No, correcting my thinking is the only thing that made living bearable. What you describe as meaningless word-plays is freedom to me.

If you are still caught in emotions and reactive, negative thinking then the good news is you can detach from it.

No time is wasted, it happened in the only way it could. You'll be fine, and you can enjoy yourself. No one really cares. Death undoes everything, so don't hold on.

 No.186490

This reminds me of a passage from the first few pages of The Steppenwolf by Hesse. You might enjoy it…

I remember an instance of this in the last days he was here, if I can call a mere fleeting glance he gave me an example of what I mean. It was when a celebrated historian, philosopher, and critic, a man of European fame, had announced a lecture in the school auditorium. I had succeeded in persuading the Steppenwolf to attend it, though at first he had little desire to do so. We went together and sat next to each other in the lecture hall. When the lecturer ascended the platform and began his address, many of his hearers, who had expected a sort of prophet, were disappointed by his rather dapper appearance and conceited air. And when he proceeded, by way
of introduction, to say a few flattering things to the audience, thanking them for their attendance in such numbers, the Steppenwolf threw me a quick look, a look which criticized both the words and the speaker of them—an unforgettable and frightful look which spoke volumes! It was a look that did not simply criticize the lecturer, annihilating the famous man with its delicate but crushing irony. That was the least of it. It was more sad than ironical; it was indeed utterly and hopelessly sad; it conveyed a quiet despair, born partly of conviction, partly of a mode of thought which had become habitual with him. This despair of his not only unmasked the conceited lecturer and dismissed with its irony the matter at hand, the expectant attitude of the public, the somewhat presumptuous title under which the lecture was announced—no, the Steppenwolf's look pierced our whole epoch, its whole overwrought activity, the whole surge and strife, the whole vanity, the whole superficial play of a shallow, opinionated intellectuality. And alas! the look went still deeper, went far below the faults, defects and hopelessness of our time, our intellect, our culture alone. It went right to the heart of all humanity, it bespoke eloquently in a single second the whole despair of a thinker, of one who knew the full worth and meaning of man's life. It said: "See what monkeys we are! Look, such is man!" and at once all renown, all intelligence, all the attainments of the spirit, all progress towards the sublime, the great and the enduring in man fell away and became a monkey's trick!

 No.186499

Op here. Even though I feel this way, I can't deny that no matter how much I want to leave the quest for wisdom behind me, I'm unable to do so. Something just drives me more and more, even to the edge of insanity, even to the point of getting stressed over these things.
And the funniest is, even though I wrote that seeking the truth is bullshit, I can't dismiss everything as equally stupid and meaningless. For example, I'm a pessimist, I could never be an optimist, no matter how convincingly someone reasoned for it.

I feel like I should already make up my own philosophy and be done with these matters.

>>186490
I will read it someday, thanks.

 No.186500

>>186464
Couldn't agree more. Probably worsened my mental health even further. Good thread, OP.

 No.186502

>>186464
>Should have just read 07th expansion VNs or watched cartoons/movies instead of wasting my time on trying to become an intellectual or wise person.
It's always fucking VNs and cartoons. Why don't you read books on the subject?

 No.186507

>>186502
>Why don't you read books on the subject?
Even people who are well read on the subject can come to feel this way; Hesse, for example, who was writing about himself in that quote. It's the same with other subjects too, like psychology, which increasingly reveals itself to be a monkey's trick with its latest inventions.

>>186485
>You need to study it to understand that it's bullshit.
Funny and true, except that sometimes there are rare epiphanies that transform your way of thinking. You have to sift through a lot of muck to find those pearls. It helps if you know what you are looking for. It's worth stating that if you are a nihilist then that is very unfortunate for you! You have to go on a (max difficulty) quest for a cure.

 No.186510

Most of them were penned by bored/depressed/ill rich people, so no wonder they lack truth and substance. They write in the most illegible ways to make themselves seem more intellectual. You can't find the "ultimate truth" by reading. It comes from lived experiences, developing your critical thinking, and a lifetime of cross referencing (if you can even find the versions of earliest texts, they're heavily guarded, and for good reason). Once you gain enough wisdom from these, you can then shift through the endless "knowledge" and learn it's true meaning. Sometimes you may come across people who speak some truth, but it's never the full truth. Either because you don't have enough wisdom to understand it, or they obfuscate the truth on purpose so it only reaches the people who have the required critical thinking.

 No.186514

>>186499
If you discover the right philosophy then it will inform every moment of your life and permeate your life with meaningful action and experience.

Buena suerte

 No.186515

It at least gives you a clarity when you read and study philosophy and you feel nothing. You can silence the confusions and contradictions in your mind over many years and you're confronted with the reality that your mind and body is unfit. The freedoms others got from the endeavour are not for you. It was wasted in terms of achieving anything or making existence bearable. At least now I know wholeheartedly I am only fit for death.

 No.186516

If you want to understand the world and how it works, the novel is a way better medium. Although I don't particularly care for the classics Hugo, Balzac, and Dostoevsky are full of gems about the world. Philosophy ended with Kant and everyone after him can just be put into the circlejerk category.

 No.186546

Nah.

Except i've never read a philosophy book in my life. They're either long winded ways of stating the obvious, or literal nonsense.

 No.186582

>>186516
Curious you say this, as I'm currently reading The Man Who Laughs from Hugo. It is pretty meh for the most part but there were some bits and pieces I liked. My problem with the classics, is well, they don't hold up well in my eyes, generally. I mean this book for example could have been awesome 200 or so years ago but nowadays the thrill-factor is much higher in books or other media so it ends up as quite a boring experience. I have this issue usually whenever I read something from before the 20th century.

>>186502
What is your problem with cartoons and VNs? They managed to entertain me better than any greek tragedy or other classics I read for example. For philosophy and intellectual stuff, I find them entertaining too but nowadays can't really see the value in them, besides getting to know the personality of the philosopher himself. I think philosophy is only good for learning about what somebody was like truly, and not for finding any higher purpose.
What do you mean by reading books on the subject? You mean more philosophy? Nah, tempting, but if I want to entertain myself I would rather just refer to those media I mentioned.

>>186510
>Most of them were penned by bored/depressed/ill rich people, so no wonder they lack truth and substance. They write in the most illegible ways to make themselves seem more intellectual.
Yes, you and this guy >>186546 are right, probably. Still, guess I had some fun time with philosophy, but it was the joy of an eager youth ready to discover true wisdom, like in all those books and movies I like.

 No.186588

>>186582
I think that as far as Hugo goes, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les miserables along with maybe his poetry are his only works worth reading. At the very least, Les miserables only. These days I can't really stand the classics anymore for the reasons you listed since I'm not very patient anymore, but looking back at that book time managed to just fly by. A lot of heavily religious themes as well and the end brought me to tears.

 No.186638

>>186588
Currently at the part where Gwynplaine gave long speeches to the peers about how they don't know about the sufferings of the common people and it was probably the best moment in the entire book for me, at this point. Unfortunately for Hugo, republicanism didn't really bring with it a golden age for us, the things Gwynplaine described, like in the future there won't be slaves or things along this line, would come only with some kind of anarchistic society.

 No.187032

>>186464
If you look at philosophy books as just a different form of entertainment then it all makes sense. Hundreds and hundreds of pages just rambling about ideas that could be summarized in a couple of paragraphs. Things that have no consequence on life and can't be either proven or disproven. Most of those are complete fluff, just there to fill pages like a cheap LN, or even any other fictional novel.

 No.187044

humans are self-interested, everything else is justifications and naval gazing

 No.187056

>>186464
Not entirely. You study it and use pieces of it to come to your own personal understanding of the world/universe (it's different for everyone), and then you just kind of nope out of that shit. Once you've developed your own concrete worldview, reading/listening to people go on about how right they are is really fucking obnoxious. Most religious and philosophical discussions can be pretty succinctly described as "insane levels of projection" and left to rot.

 No.187222

What else is one supposed to do? Observe drawings that continually extoll simple platitudes such as the power of friendship, love and other norman values? Mash buttons to control a computer program in a way that will not force you back to an earlier state of the program? There's only so much of these activities that I could take. If this site truly wishes to "disregard females, acquire magic", then it is fitting that time should be spent comprehending one's powers, the nature of which normals couldn't possibly understand.

 No.187254

>>187222
Nice deconstruction of anime and video games. But it can be done with philosophy too, it is nothing but rich intellectuals pretending they know shit, just because they read the writings of other rich intellectuals who lived before them. At least anime or games are entertaining, even if you disagree with the story or values they portray to you. Just like how this guy said >>187056
>Once you've developed your own concrete worldview, reading/listening to people go on about how right they are is really fucking obnoxious

 No.187255

I spent a great deal of my life reading philosophy. It was all a waste. Now when the itch comes I just think of Diogenes life and stop worrying about these matters of God

 No.187256

>>187255
Why do you think it a waste?

 No.187266

File: 1642228470848.png (200.39 KB, 640x480, 4:3, 162911045326.png) ImgOps iqdb

Plato is garbage. All philosophy before Kant is an exercise in exploiting the imprecise nature of language as well as tedious and empty rambling on concepts such as being, essence substance and so on. They all imagined that by investigating the concepts in themselves, by the use of pure reason, would reveal the objective nature of reality, despite the fact that all the schools of philosophy disagreed with each other. They were all using their own "pure reason" to arrive at different conclusions and so revealed that there was no objective knowledge to be gained by this process, only arbitrary personal preference.

For thousands of years the only solution to this impasse was skepticism or spiritual faith. Skepticism is unsatisfactory to most because it is the desire of reason to know, and this thirst cannot be quenched easily, whereas spiritual faith relies on personal feeling and intuition which can appear to be entirely arbitrary to those who do not share the same enthusiasm.

Luckily Kant-Sama broke this deadlock by proving it is impossible to acquire any objective knowledge using pure reason but we can have knowledge of things as they appear to us. The grip of the old method of philosophy was finally broken, and the flowering of new, sophisticated methods and perspectives was now possible. It's just a shame that so many thousands of years were wasted with the old, uncritical method.

 No.187267


 No.187270

File: 1642239537774.jpg (124.31 KB, 704x480, 22:15, 149193394046.jpg) ImgOps iqdb

>>187266
Why did you repost my post from another website? I'll have you know that when I wrote that I was in thie midst of skeptical despair due to the meddling of insolent normalfags. I now think that the philosophical vocation, even though extremely difficult and sometimes beyond any possible coherence, is in fact the highest calling of mankind and am willing to prostrate myself for the forgiveness of Plato, even though I suspect that his student, Aristotle surpassed the master.

 No.187271

>>186467
word salad



[Go to top] [Catalog] [Return][Post a Reply]
Delete Post [ ]
[ Home ] [ wiz / dep / hob / lounge / jp / meta / games / music ] [ all ] [  Rules ] [  FAQ ] [  Search /  History ] [  Textboard ] [  Wiki ]